US Navy Chiefs Celebrate Their 125th Birthday

One of the longest and certainly most important celebrations are about to befall a special group of American sailors this year with the coming of the 125th birthday of the United States Navy Chief’. April 1st 2018 will ring in a birthday that spans decades of United states Navy traditions, training and hard work. Dedication and sacrifice not seen at this level by many.

The Thin Khaki Line is comprised of the most excellent of Sailors that have qualified through their hard work and training to raise to the rank of Navy Chief Petty Officer. Donning gold fouled anchors, receiving a vessel and charge book at their initiation into the Goat Locker these Chiefs have become the newest of the rare breed of Goats (an affectionate term for US Navy Chiefs and usher in a young and committed work force of Chief whose aim is the safety and security of America with their role in the US Nay. They serve as the backbone of the US Navy and their role ensures generations of freedom and service to a loving American nation.

Ask the Chief
Why? Because that is where the answers are. Not just a single Chief but thousands and thousands of them that are communicating with each other that tap into centuries of experience that have been handed down by Chief to Chief over these many years. US Navy Chiefs are not just a single Sailor but tens of thousands if not more. When you have a question and need answers you are tapping into experience. Plain and simple.

With Navy Chief birthdays come birthday gifts.

Some of the most innovative US Navy Challenge Coins crafted by Navy Crow were designs specifically created for US Navy Chiefs and have been among the most popular challenge coins they have ever created.

The perfect US Navy Chief coin for his collection and the perfect military gift.

Something from the Goat Locker? A magnificent US Navy Chief Challenge coin with goat, cover, crossed arms and surface warfare device. Part of a set of spectacular US Navy Coins designed for the United States Navy Chiefs.

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Navy Chief Submarine Warfare. A Dolphin!

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As A Chief did you ever go on Westpac? Serve in Japan. After a number of years and the desire to bring a US Navy Chief coin to the forefront we developed a coin fitting the role of a US Navy Chief serving in Japan with the look of a Shogun, Japanese elements like the Torii gate and the three Chief’s rank anchors.

US Navy Coins

Variety? Absolutely. Like the many US Navy Chiefs that hail with ancestral ties to many foreign countries they enjoy variety and have special interests stemming from different backgrounds and interests. Navy Crow has developed a line of Goat Locker military gifts specifically designed for United States Navy Chiefs that were created both out of respect but also in line with their core values of quality and the highest level of craftsmanship.

Conceivably one of the most recognized designs found on the internet when a search is conducted for US Navy Chief art and design. Created years ago by the military artists of Stay Frosty Enterprises, LLC and printed for US Navy Sailors by Navy Crow this imaginative Goat Locker and Anchored design has been seen in US Navy Chief Messes all  over the world.

Popular US Navy Sayings, Mottos, And Slogans

10 Things to know about U.S. Navy Chiefs

(Source – Navy Life)

1. The earliest known use of the title “chief” dates back to 1776 when Jacob Wasbie, a cook’s mate, was pronounced “Chief Cook” aboard USS Alfred. The title was largely informal and was used to denote him as the foremost cook aboard the ship.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2016) Fiscal Year 2017 chief petty officers stand at attention during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2016) Fiscal Year 2017 chief petty officers stand at attention during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)

2. Since 1797, only two ratings for chiefs that have remained in continuous use are boatswain’s mate and gunner’s mate.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 9, 2016) – Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Mumira Ferah from San Jose, Calif., gives instructions aboard USS Ross (DDG 71) during a replenishment at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) Aug. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 9, 2016) – Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Mumira Ferah from San Jose, Calif., gives instructions aboard USS Ross (DDG 71) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) Aug. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)

3. On March 21, 1917, Loretta Walsh became the first woman Navy petty officer when sworn in as a chief yeoman.

PACIFIC OCEAN (April 1, 2014) Chief Ship’s Serviceman Barbara Lynch, left, Chief Cryptologic Technician Technical Ashley Jones, Chief Information Systems Technician Warren Quiambao, and Chief Legalman Justin Wheeler demonstrate the wear of chief petty officer uniforms throughout history. The chief petty officer grade was first established April 1, 1893 by Navy General Order 409. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/ Released)

ACIFIC OCEAN (April 1, 2014) Chief Ship’s Serviceman Barbara Lynch, left, Chief Cryptologic Technician Technical Ashley Jones, Chief Information Systems Technician Warren Quiambao, and Chief Legalman Justin Wheeler demonstrate the wear of chief petty officer uniforms throughout history. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/ Released)

4. The advent of a rocker device was the first distinction and was originally borrowed from the master-at-arms rating and became official in 1894. The foul anchor cap device was approved in 1905, and collar devices became official in 1959.

WASHINGTON (April 1, 2015) Command Master Chief Christian Detje, assigned to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard, stands at ease during a celebration of the 122nd birthday of the chief petty officer rank at the United States Navy Memorial. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

WASHINGTON (April 1, 2015) Command Master Chief Christian Detje, assigned to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard, stands at ease during a celebration of the 122nd birthday of the chief petty officer rank at the United States Navy Memorial. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

5. By 1941, all chief petty officers were authorized to wear khaki working uniforms. ALNAV 16 (Feb. 21, 1941) authorized khaki working uniforms for all chief petty officers and officers serving on all ships and shore stations.

SASEBO, Japan: Chief Navy Counselor Bethany Hale passes through sideboys after being pinned chief petty officer at the Career Education Center aboard Commander, U.S. Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David R. Krigbaum/Released)

SASEBO, Japan: Chief Navy Counselor Bethany Hale passes through sideboys after being pinned chief petty officer at the Career Education Center aboard Commander, U.S. Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David R. Krigbaum/Released)

6. There are approximately 30,000+ chief, senior chief and master chief petty officers in the Navy.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2014) Chief petty officers assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, and Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, stand in ranks with the Chiefs Mess after they are pinned in the hangar bay aboard Carl Vinson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2014) Chief petty officers assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, and Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, stand in ranks with the Chiefs Mess after they are pinned in the hangar bay aboard Carl Vinson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

7. A chief petty officer is equivalent to a gunnery sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps, sergeant first class in the U.S. Army, and a master sergeant in the U.S. Air Force.

Gunnery Sgt. Corey Hall participates in a CPO 365 Phase II drill and cadence event during CPO Pride Week 2016 in Pearl Hawaii, Sept. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johans Chavarro/Released)

Gunnery Sgt. Corey Hall participates in a CPO 365 Phase II drill and cadence event during CPO Pride Week 2016 in Pearl Hawaii, Sept. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johans Chavarro/Released)

8. U.S. Navy chief petty officers are afforded more responsibility than any other enlisted rank in the world.

Chiefs combination covers lay displayed on a table prior to the arrival of the U.S. Navy's newest Chief Petty Officers, Sept. 19, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A. Prill (RELEASED))

Chiefs combination covers lay displayed on a table prior to the arrival of the U.S. Navy’s newest chief petty officers, Sept. 19, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A. Prill/Released)

9. More than 50 chief petty officers have been awarded the Medal of Honor.

WASHINGTON (Feb. 29, 2016) President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. during a ceremony at the White House. Byers received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a hostage rescue operation in December 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Oscar Sosa/Released)

WASHINGTON (Feb. 29, 2016) President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. during a ceremony at the White House. Byers received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a hostage rescue operation in December 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Oscar Sosa/Released)

10. On average, Sailors advance to chief petty officer in about 13 years of active duty.

EVERETT, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2012) Newly-pinned chief petty officers salute during a chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom at Naval Station Everett. The Naval Station welcomed 24 newly pinned Sailors to the rank of chief petty officer during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen/Released)

EVERETT, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2012) Newly-pinned chief petty officers salute during a chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom at Naval Station Everett. The Naval Station welcomed 24 newly pinned Sailors to the rank of a chief petty officer during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen/Released)

So as you can see there is a huge amount of history and tradition when it comes to United States Navy Chiefs. They are as stated above the one group of enlisted officers that have more responsibility than any other enlisted rank in the world and that is one clearly defined reason they are called the backbone of the United States Navy.